A Little Solstice

IMG_4563We have come inside. By winter solstice, hibernation should be on the agenda. But, until recently, our weather has been so mild that we have continued with outside play. This week, with short days, a little rain, a little bluster, some frost, and a lot of gray, we finally took up wintertime pursuits.

A little Jack Frost artwork on our wooden steps. It looked almost like a woodcut.

A little Jack Frost artwork on our wooden steps. It looked almost like a woodcut.

Looks a bit like the frost fronds.

Looks a bit like the frost fronds.

George is building a beautiful bookcase, I’m making a quilt, marking up the FEDCO seed catalog, and indulging in a frenzy of beekeeping research (what kind of hive, what kind of bees, how many hives, when to order …. I’m in heaven).

We have a lot of apples wedged in tree branches. Some little critter snacked on this one.

Our property is an artwork of apples wedged in tree branches. Some little critter snacked on this one.

We had a sunny day right before Solstice and I set out to take some fungi and moss photos.

A puffball of some sort?  With a spiderweb filament across it's doorway?

A puffball of some sort? With a spiderweb filament across it’s doorway?

I grew up in New England’s woods and seemed to learn plant names by osmosis. But mushrooms, lichen, and mosses remained just that–mushrooms, lichen, and mosses–I never got any farther down the identification route.

I'm pretty sure this is a turkey tail fungus.  Lovely against the stump patterns.

I’m pretty sure this is a turkey tail fungus. Nice against the stump patterns.

Inspired by several fellow bloggers and determined to further my education, I found some lovely examples. IMG_4425But I’m still working on figuring out what they are.  IMG_4449Unfortunately most of the online sites focus on edible fungi, so I’m still in the dark on most of these.  IMG_4507IMG_4401I have been doing descriptive searches, such as “golden fungus surrounding branch” to no avail.  IMG_4321Granted, I haven’t spent much time on this (too busy researching bees), but if I wait to identify them, I’ll never get this posted.  IMG_4519I really need to get a book.IMG_4432

Things aren’t any better on the moss identification front.  But I love their miniature landscapes.IMG_4464

IMG_4466IMG_4336IMG_4389After months without a fox sighting, this week George spotted this fellow sunning across the street.IMG_4532At first I thought he might be sick or dead, he was so still.  But no, he just took advantage of a nice protected area to catch a little sun on a windy, raw day.  Smart boy.IMG_4542

Aside from the one bright day, IMG_4416we have had low clouds or have been socked in with fog.

Solstice afternoon.

Solstice afternoon.

Gloomy outside, but oh-so-very cozy within.  I appreciate the four distinct seasons here and the pendulum swing of winter solstice.

Water crystals in our roadside ditch.

Water crystals in our roadside ditch.

Zoe loves the winter. Happy holidays.IMG_4672

Going To Town

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We live in a very small town in the hills rolling inland from Penobscot Bay in midcoast Maine.  It has a surprising wealth of amenities for such a little place–a good market, friendly post-office, library, farmers’ market, winery, distillery, two restaurants, and TWO tractor dealerships–everything we need, really.

As an added advantage, we also are close to four towns strung along the coast–Belfast, Camden, Rockland, and Damariscotta.  Each has a distinct personality.  When we visited this area while traveling in our RV in 2014, we spent most of our time in Camden and Belfast.  But we didn’t spend much time in Rockland.  IMG_4015

Since moving here, each town has developed a niche in our lives—certain things are best in one, others in another.  But Rockland has become our overall go-to town.  I’m a little surprised at how quickly I have come to love it.  When we were house hunting, well-heeled and well-intentioned folks in Camden (a picture perfect coastal village) warned us that Rockland was … well … a little dicey … higher crime, more drugs, more problems.  And our initial impressions were not particularly favorable.  To be blunt, it just seemed uglier than the other towns.  Objectively, that’s probably a fair assessment. Although all the coastal towns draw tourists, Rockland remains more of a working class town than its neighbors, with viable waterfront industries, including the only carrageenan (a seaweed extract) plant in the country.

Industry in the harbor. The smokestack is at a cement factory down the road from Rockland.

A harbor view.  The left smokestack is a cement factory down the road from Rockland.  The downtown brick buildings and old courthouse are just visible in the middle of the photo.

The old courthouse.

Here’s a closeup of the lovely 1874 old courthouse tower.

This may have no relationship to carageenan, but it's lovely seaweed.

This seaweed likely has no relationship to carrageenan, but I like it.

Rockland has pockets of poverty and depressing living conditions.  It is a regional center for shopping and services, so there are strings of unlovely big-box stores on the town’s outskirts.

End of the tracks.

End of the tracks.

As with many things, however, as we got to know it, Rockland became a lot less ugly and veered towards beautiful.  IMG_4129

The breakwater and lighthouse are just below the horizon

Breakwater and lighthouse are just below the horizon

At first, it was the shopping and services that drew us there.  It was the most convenient place to find the things that our little town does not provide.  Over time, the town grew on us more and more.

Lobster traps and buoys outside home on the water.

Lobster traps and buoys.

The people are remarkably friendly, there is a lively downtown, colorful history and architecture, ferries running to the nearby islands, and the backdrop of a stunning breakwater stretching across the harbor entrance, with a lighthouse at its tip.

The harbor breakwater, almost a mile long with a lighthouse at its end.

The harbor breakwater, almost a mile long with the lighthouse (the tiny white speck) at its end.

Larger fishing boat heading out past the breakwater.

The breakwater lighthouse.

An artsy shot of a railroad spike sculpture with a glimpse of the lighthouse on the horizon.

An artsy shot of a railroad spike sculpture with a glimpse of the lighthouse.

Plus, it’s interesting, with messy, contentious local politics and a tendency to party (it holds both a lobster festival and a blues festival in the summer).

Rockland's Christmas tree made of lobster pots.

Town Christmas tree made of lobster pots.

Rockland is a town of rocks and water.

The breakwater was built over twenty years at the end of the 1800s.

The breakwater took over 20 years to build at the end of the 1800s.

Breakwater lighthouse

Breakwater lighthouse

This day the water was a little choppy beyond the breakwater.

This day the water was a little choppy outside the breakwater.

And almost dead calm on the harbor side.

And almost dead calm inside.

Up until the Civil War, it had a thriving port and industries–with granite and lime quarries, lime kilns, and rich fishing grounds. 

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Pulling lobster traps from a small skiff in the harbor.

Pulling lobster traps from a small skiff in the harbor.

It built clipper ships–fast beauties that sailed the world, with fittingly aggressive names–Red Jacket, Springbok, Defiance, Rattler, Live Yankee, Anglo-Saxon, Progressive, Yankee Ranger, Young Mechanic, and one misfit soothing name, Euterpe, giver of delight.

Many of Rockland’s old buildings were lost to fire and age.

The Odd Fellows Hall still has closets of odd regalia on the top floor. It's crying out for a paint job.

The old Odd Fellows Hall still has closets of odd regalia left behind on the top floor. It’s a lovely building but crying out for a paint job.

Its downtown, however, retains architecture from the late 19th and early 20th century, with exquisite details for anyone who takes the time to look up a little.  IMG_4014IMG_4021IMG_4043The downtown has a wonderful bakery, excellent restaurants, galleries, stores, and the Farnsworth museum, featuring the Wyeths and other local artists.

I love how the girl in this shot is captivated by the window display.

I love how the girl in this shot is captivated by the window display.

I’m a little embarrassed to say we haven’t been to the Farnsworth yet.  I can blame the weather.  IMG_4050We wanted to focus on outside work in the good weather and museums in the winter.  But our weather has been so mild that we continue to work outside.

Even the pigeons are enjoying the sun.

Even the pigeons are enjoying the sun.

More sunbathing.

More sunbathing.

Museum weather will come soon enough, I’m sure.IMG_4191

Finally, the gym at Rockland’s YMCA (which is inexpensive and open to everyone) has a full-length bank of windows looking out on the harbor—it must be one of the best gym views in the country.  Sweet.      IMG_4113